THAT Debate, and the Beauty of Hindsight

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I am pleased to report that a well-known sporting organisation …

Comment on THAT Debate, and the Beauty of Hindsight by stevo.

I am pleased to report that a well-known sporting organisation is apparently no longer several months behind on a smallish monthly invoice. Maybe it had some kind of windfall recently.

stevo Also Commented

THAT Debate, and the Beauty of Hindsight
Apropos of nothing at all, I just watched the documentary “Betting on Zero”, in which a former Herbalife distributor tells how he realised he was never going to make any money from his nutrition clubs, and that most people in his position would have recruited a new distributor and sold their lease to them. “The kind of people that can do that, I mean, they’re crooks. When you know, when you’re trying to get somebody into a business, that you know they are going to fail… that is a crook.”


Recent Comments by stevo

On Grounds for Judicial Review
On the subject of the Ibrox banner, a quick search of the planning enforcement orders on the Glasgow City Council website shows a complaint about “attachment of banner to listed building” was submitted on August 4th and is under consideration.


Time for Scots Government to Take Bull by the Horns
Nacho Novo never played for Airdrie. Fernandez was the only real success story from Archibald’s doomed experiment although Antonio Calderon and Jesus Sanjuan went on to play for Kilmarnock, and Javier Sanchez Broto also had a short spell at Celtic. This was one of the more scandalous episodes in Scottish football. A club, already in severe financial difficulties, was blatantly being exploited for the benefit of one individual. Archibald sold his scheme to the fans on the basis that for every foreign player successfully moved on, an equal or better replacement would be brought in. He reinstated the diamond on the jersey and renamed the Shyberry Excelsior to “New Broomfield”, and the fans lapped it up, especially as the product on the park was more than acceptable. Some of them saw through it, of course, and were duly vilified for their trouble. The story also involved players on alleged pocket money wages, implausible plans to have Airdrie games shown on Spanish TV (for which the club would somehow receive all the proceeds) and a mounting string of unpaid bills. At one stage Archibald was locked out of the stadium by the administrators until a fans’ group handed over £15K to bail him out – an egregious waste of money as the wheels were already coming off. Supposedly, in the final days of his preferred bidder status, he rang round a load of clubs desperately trying to raise funds by offloading his players. Airdrie managed to struggle on for another season before finally going into liquidation. I don’t recall the football authorities taking much of an interest at the time (at least not publicly), although after Archibald was shown the door, the club was allowed to postpone some fixtures while the administrators sought a new bidder. SPL secretary Iain Blair even confirmed that Airdrie would be eligible for promotion to the top flight despite being in administration.


The Lost Voice of the Armageddon Virus
I think the tenor of the argument is that the purchase price was actually £1 plus compliance with the terms of the Share Purchase Agreement.


Towards a More Professional SFA
Minor correction – it’s Robert Reid (rather than William) who is the Partick Thistle club historian.


Small Price to Pay?
I hear from an absolutely reliable source that a well-known sporting organisation is several months behind on a smallish monthly invoice. It’s not the first time, though.


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